Home LATEST NEWS La Niña is back, but not reversing the trend of global warming

La Niña is back, but not reversing the trend of global warming

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THE’OMM predicted that La Niña would reappear at the end of 2021 and believes that the phenomenon will probably low to moderate and lower than the 2020-2021 episode, according to a statement released Tuesday.

Despite the cooling effect of this natural climatological phenomenon, temperatures in many parts of the world are expected to be above average due to the heat accumulated in the atmosphere, trapped by record levels of greenhouse gases. tight, explains the organization based in Geneva, Switzerland.

TheNiña 2020-2021, which is generally felt during the second half of the phenomenon, means that 2021 will rank among the top 10hottest years, rather than the hottest year “,” text “:” The cooling effect of LaNiña 2020-2021, which is generally felt during the second half of the phenomenon, means that 2021 will rank among the 10 years the hottest, rather than the hottest year “}}”>The cooling effect of La Niña 2020-2021, which is typically felt during the second half of the phenomenon, means 2021 will rank among the 10 warmest years, rather than the hottest year., underlined the secretary general ofOMM, Petteri Taalas.

This is only a short-lived respite and does not reverse the long-term warming trend or reduce the urgency for climate action.

A quote from Petteri Taalas, Secretary General of the World Meteorological Organization

According to new forecasts from theOMM, there is a 90% chance that surface water temperatures in the tropical Pacific Ocean will remain at levels La Niña until the end of 2021, and%) that these temperatures will remain at these levels throughout the first quarter of 2022 “,” text “:” a moderate probability (70 to 80%) that these temperatures will remain at these levels throughout the first quarter of 2022 “}} ‘ >a moderate probability (70 to 80%) that these temperatures will remain at these levels throughout the first quarter of 2022, underlines the press release.

The impact of La Niña, which occurs every two to seven years, is felt over a large part of the Earth in the form of variations in atmospheric pressure, winds and precipitation, with generally the opposite effects of another phenomenon, El Niño.

But climate change caused by human activities influences these phenomena.

Rising temperatures

Despite the effect of La Niña in part of the Pacific, theOMM predicts above-average sea surface temperatures for the period December to February, with the exception of the northwestern part of the North American continent, the Indian subcontinent and the Indochinese peninsula.

Models predict a winter unusually hot in the far north, northeast of Asia and the Arctic.

Above average temperatures are also expected in eastern and southeastern North America, including most of the Caribbean, but also northeastern Asia and Europe.

Higher than average temperatures are also forecast in the South Pacific, and in the equatorial part of Africa to Madagascar in the east.

In contrast, much of South America will have temperatures within the norm.

Precipitation is also expected to be higher under the influence of La Niña in Southeast Asia just north of the equator to the southwestern Pacific, as well as northeastern and far northwestern South America.

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