Home LATEST NEWS HEALTH Maude Cyr, an ultra-marathoner struggling with post-COVID-19 syndrome

Maude Cyr, an ultra-marathoner struggling with post-COVID-19 syndrome

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Anxiety, post-traumatic syndrome, difficulty concentrating: the daily life of Maude Cyr, resident of Pemberton, British Columbia, has been turned upside down since her illness. Today, his symptoms aren’t as bad as they were a few months ago, but they’re still there.

: I speak as before, finally, but inside me the ideas are struggling to organize themselves.”,”text”:”It’s a disease, basically, which is invisible, says Maude Cyr. It does not show: I speak as before, finally, but inside me the ideas have difficulty in organizing.”}}”>It’s a disease, basically, which is invisible, says Maude Cyr. It doesn’t show: I’m talking as before, finally, but, inside me, ideas are struggling to organize themselves.

The first six months particularly trying

Maude Cyr had visual problems, lost hair, and the most disabling thing for this accomplished ultra-marathoner was the muscle problems. She was no longer able to train as she wanted, and the frequent podium finisher had to give up all of her racing goals.

Maude Cyr reads in an armchair.

A year after contracting COVID-19, ultramarathoner Maude Cyr still has difficulty concentrating, especially when she reads.

Photo: TurnedNews.com / Benoit Ferradini

It was not until November 2021 that Maud Cyr was referred to a clinic for the treatment of cases of post-COVID-19 syndrome, commonly known as COVID long. burnout (exhaustion).”,”text”:”When I went to see the doctors, they didn’t know what to do, explains Maude Cyr. They told me to wait. Some told me it was depression, some told me it might be burnout (exhaustion).”}}”>When I went to see the doctors, they didn’t know what to do, she explains. They told me to wait. Some told me it was depression, some told me it might be burnout (exhaustion).

At the Long-Term COVID-19 Clinic at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, medical director Adeera Levin says 75-80% of patients see an improvement in their symptoms after 6 months.months”,”text”:”Others recover after 9months”}}”>Others recover after 9 months, she adds. What we observe, as in many diseases, is variability.

Our COVID-19 file: what you need to know

2,600 long-term COVID victims

The St-Paul’s clinic is part of a network of 4 post-COVID-19 syndrome treatment clinics in British Columbia created in January 2021. In one year, the 25 to 30 doctors and researchers who work in these clinics have saw 2600 patients.

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Adeera Levin. What makes patients respond to disease the way they do? Why a patient responds in a certain way and another who has the same virus with the same severity leaves the hospital unscathed”,”text”:”We are studying the role of inflammation, or even genetics, says the Dr Adeera Levin. What makes patients respond to disease the way they do? Why a patient responds a certain way and another who has the same virus with the same severity leaves the hospital unscathed”}}”>We are studying the role of inflammation, or even genetics, says Dr. Adeera Levin. What makes patients respond to disease the way they do? Why does one patient respond a certain way and another who has the same virus with the same severity leaves the hospital unharmed?

From 10 to 30% of patients affected by post-COVID-19 syndrome

Scientists don’t have many answers yet. Why some people have long-lasting COVID remains an enigma. Some studies claim that 10% of COVID-19 patients will suffer from some form of the syndrome. Other studies mention rather 20 to 30%.

Katy McLean does physical therapy exercises in her living room.

Katy McLean is too tired to leave her apartment more than once a week.

Photo: TurnedNews.com / Ben Nelms

According to Katy McLean, one of the patients at the St-Paul’s Hospital clinic, there is a lack of information and interest in the chronic form of COVID-19.

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Health officials don’t really talk about the chronic side of COVID-19, she explains. They mostly talk about the acute form of the disease. Hospitalizations, deaths, cases. I think not all people are aware that they can also have a chronic form of COVID.

Seventeen months after her diagnosis, Katy McLean still struggles to walk and suffers from severe fatigue.

I use a cane, a walker, and sometimes a wheelchair. »

A quote from Katy McLean

Patients like Katy McLean and Maude Cyr are regularly treated, studied and brought together in focus groups, giving them much-needed emotional support.

: mental fog, chronic fatigue and pulmonary restrictions. So I have mental fog, and I meet people who are in the same situation as me. And then it’s so huge to feel that I’m not the only one in this!”,”text”:”There are three groups, says Maude Cyr: mental fog, chronic fatigue and pulmonary restrictions. So I have mental fog, and I meet people who are in the same situation as me. And then it’s so huge to feel that I’m not the only one in this!”}}”>There are three groups, says Maude Cyr: mental fog, chronic fatigue and pulmonary restrictions. So I have mental fog and I meet people who are in the same situation as me. And then, it’s so huge to feel that I’m not the only one in this!

However, the most important thing, for Maude Cyr as for Katy McLean, is that the public is better informed about the risks of the post-COVID-19 syndrome.

Me, I hope that it will be officially recognized, so that people are immediately directed to treatment, that they recover better and that they live better with their disorders., concludes Maude Cyr.

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