Home WORLD EUROPA Sink metal to save Ukraine’s economy | War in Ukraine

Sink metal to save Ukraine’s economy | War in Ukraine

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A heavy responsibility that Galushkin Mykola, head of production, does not take lightly: [activités: pour] support the livelihood of thousands of employees and […] give Ukraine’s finances a boost.”,”text”:”We have a duty to take care of employees’ families. This is also why the company restarted its [activités: pour] support the livelihood of thousands of employees and […] give Ukraine’s finances a boost.”}}”>We have a duty to take care of employees’ families. This is also why the company restarted its [activités : pour] support the livelihood of thousands of employees and […] give Ukraine’s finances a boost.

Galushkin Mykola, head of production at ArcelorMittal Kryvyi Rih.

Photo: TurnedNews.com / Frédéric Arnould

The integrated mining and steel plant includes iron mines, ore processing plants and two surface mines, a coking plant, steel workshops and three metal rolling workshops. The company, which employs more than 22,000 people and indirectly supports tens of thousands of others, had to cease its activities at the start of the war. Well almost…

The Kryvyi Rih Metallurgical Plant employs 22,000 people in the region.

Photo: TurnedNews.com / Frédéric Arnould

Last February, mining activities were interrupted in the region as a precautionary measure, in fear of power cuts which could have prevented any evacuation of miners. As the extraction of raw materials was at a standstill, one of the largest employers in the Kryvyi Rih region had to reduce its activities in the blast furnaces to a minimum.

Galushkin Mykola was very worried since closing a steel plant completely was out of the question. Not only can such a closure take several weeks and seriously damage the facilities, but the complexity of the process sometimes forces you to have to wait a few years before being able to restart the foundries.

However, with the help of the railway and the Ukrainian government, this ArcelorMittal plant, which was privatized in 1996, was able to have the minimum necessary to operate in slow motion thanks to a supply of raw materials from Poland. notably, since the Russian supply chain was completely shut down at the start of the war.

Something to relieve employees like Donskov Anton, a Ukrainian who takes care of operations in the control room of blast furnace number 6: I was worried, because I feared that the factory would be closed until the end of the war. With the partial resumption of activities, this allows me to have enough money to feed and take care of my family.

Donskov Anton feared that the Kryvyi Rih plant would remain closed until the end of the war.

Photo: TurnedNews.com / Frédéric Arnould

He is also proud, he says, to contribute to the economic recovery of his country and also to be able, by extension, help the army to defend his country. A patriotic impulse which moreover pushed no less than 2,000 employees of the metallurgical company to enlist in the army.

In her office on the company’s sprawling grounds in Kryvyi Rih, Natalya Marynyuk, who heads the employees’ union, highlights the dedication of its members who left their families to defend the country against Russian onslaught: We have provided them with bulletproof vests, helmets, suitcases, bags, and we are giving a hand to their families who have remained in town.

So far, eight factory workers have been killed in action and three are missing.

For the moment, due to the forced slowdown in activities, the company can only provide employment for 62% of its staff with, in addition, salary cuts.

Before the start of the war, ArcelorMittal Kryvyi Rih exported 85% of its production to 115 countries. The steel made in the birthplace of Volodymyr Zelensky was used in particular in the construction of the Burj Khalifa building in Dubai.

Some workers at Ukraine’s Kryvyi Rih steel plant have been smiling since the facility reopened.

Photo: TurnedNews.com / Frédéric Arnould

With the closure of the ports of Odessa and Mykolaiv, the company had to resort to transporting its products by rail. While pre-invasion exports were mostly directed to the Middle East, North and West Africa, Ukrainian steel is now being shipped to Europe, the United States and Canada, among others.

Galushkin Mykola is crossing its fingers in hopes of being able to restart several departments of the plant over the next few weeks. A hope that everyone maintains here, even if they are aware that the war could, at any time, take a dramatic turn for their country. In the meantime, the steel continues to flow…

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