Home LATEST NEWS Suspicions of data falsification hang over 15 years of Alzheimer’s study

Suspicions of data falsification hang over 15 years of Alzheimer’s study

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Researcher Sylvain Lesné and his colleagues at the University of Minnesota showed that a subtype of beta-amyloid protein aggregates was responsible for dementia in rats. This work thus confirmed the hypothesis that the accumulation of these proteins on the surface of neurons formed plaques that blocked the transfer of signals between neurons, leading to cell death and the appearance of Alzheimer’s symptoms.

Since 2006, these results have been taken up by dozens of other scientists in their research efforts against Alzheimer’s. They have notably been used as a starting point in the creation of drugs, including the controversial Aduhelm and Simufilam, the former currently on the market and the latter in a phase 3 clinical trial.

Review Nature reacted to the publication of Science adding a note to the 2006 article.

Nature have been alerted to concerns about some of the data used in this article. Nature is currently reviewing the situation and intends to address these concerns as soon as possible. In the meantime, readers are urged to exercise caution when using the results presented in this article”,”text”:”The editors of Nature have been alerted to concerns about some of the data used in this article . Nature is currently investigating the situation and intends to address these concerns as soon as possible. In the meantime, readers are advised to exercise caution when using the results presented in this article”}}”>The editors of Nature have been alerted to concerns about some of the data used in this article. Nature is currently reviewing the situation and intends to address these concerns as soon as possible. In the meantime, readers are advised to exercise caution when using the results presented in this article.can we read at the beginning of the study.

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It was Vanderbilt University neuroscientist Matthew Schrag who first sounded the alarm. He found suspicious some images used in the 2006 works and in other articles published since concerning the disease which strikes 50 million people in the world and for which there is no effective treatment.

The investigation of more than six months of Science seems to prove him right. The review, which consulted several leading researchers in research against Alzheimer’s disease, questions hundreds of images, including more than 70 in the original articles by Sylvain Lesné.

One of the experts consulted, the molecular biologist Elisabeth Bik, is quoted by Science : The authors seem to have composed figures by assembling parts of photos from different experiences. The experimental results obtained were perhaps not the desired results, and these data could have been modified to… better correspond to a hypothesis.

The researcher Sylvain Lesné did not want to answer the questions of Science. A spokesperson for the University of Minnesota said the university is reviewing complaints about her work.

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If these suspicions were confirmed, it would be one of the greatest scandals of all time to hit medical research. Be aware that hundreds of millions of grant dollars may have been misused since this research. And that’s not counting all the studies on Alzheimer’s disease carried out over the past 16 years and whose initial hypothesis would be erroneous.

Beta-amyloid protein plaques were one of the two main avenues of disease research. The other hypothesis concerns the fibrous clusters of the tau protein. In a diseased brain, tau proteins collapse and coil up, forming tangles that block nutrients from reaching neurons, leading to cell death.

With the aging of the world’s population, the number of people with dementia is expected to triple and reach 152 million by 2050. No less than 564,000 Canadians are affected. In 15 years, there will be 937,000, according to the Alzheimer Society of Canada.

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